loader image
Friday, June 21, 2024
86.1 F
McAllen
We Welcome your Press Release
- Advertisement -

Meet Charity: Breast Cancer Survivor

Translate to Spanish or other 102 languages!

Being diagnosed with stage three breast cancer at age 27 forced me to grow up quickly. Now, I’m on a mission to help other cancer survivors cope and share their stories.  Image courtesy of CDC
Being diagnosed with stage three breast cancer at age 27 forced me to grow up quickly. Now, I’m on a mission to help other cancer survivors cope and share their stories. Image courtesy of CDC

Mega Doctor News

- Advertisement -

Being diagnosed with stage three breast cancer at age 27 forced me to grow up quickly. Now, I’m on a mission to help other cancer survivors cope and share their stories.

Removing My Ovaries to Protect My Health

There Isn’t Just One Face to Breast Cancer 

When Charity was diagnosed with breast cancer at 27, she faced a series of difficult decisions. Watch her videos to learn what steps she took to be proactive about her health and her cancer risk – and what she wants young women to know about their health.

- Advertisement -

After my breast cancer diagnosis, I met with a genetic counselor and tested positive for a BRCA2 gene mutation, which puts me at high risk for both breast and ovarian cancer.

Having removed my breasts as part of my breast cancer treatment, I decided to further reduce my cancer risk by removing my ovaries.

This decision to remove my ovaries was not easy. It brought feelings of loss—like losing the opportunity to have my own kids in the future.

Still, I feel it was the best decision for my health and have no regrets.

- Advertisement -

Coping Through Comedy

After my cancer treatment, I started performing standup comedy to share my cancer experience with others. Talking about my story helped me process my feelings.

I now work with other young cancer survivors to help them express their anger, frustration, anxiety, and sadness around cancer through humor.

Through comedy, I help survivors make their stories their own and help others understand what it’s like to be a cancer survivor.

Balancing Mental and Physical Health

For me, mental health is just as important as physical health. This means moving my body when I can, but not being hard on myself when I need a day off. I remind myself that progress happens over time.

I practice self-care by prioritizing what makes me happy. My self-care habits include yoga and meditation, therapy, and journaling.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

More Articles

Breast Cancer Survivor: Christine

Christine felt overwhelmed by her diagnosis, which had been delayed by 6 months.

Mica’s Ewing’s Sarcoma Cancer Survivor Story

Micah had a primary tumor on his upper femur, a secondary tumor on his lower femur, and large spots across his rib and pelvis and up his spine.

Talk to Your Doctor About Prostate Cancer: Lorenzo’s Story

What’s Lorenzo biggest advice for men who may be faced with similar circumstances? “Listen to your doctors, concerned relatives, and associates. Keep a positive attitude and continue to enjoy life to the fullest.”

38-Year-Old Colon Cancer Survivor Re-Writes Her Outlook On Life

Carla Deschamps of North Bergen admits she had never heard of a colonoscopy.
- Advertisement -
×