loader image
Friday, May 17, 2024
83.8 F
McAllen
We Welcome your Press Release
- Advertisement -

Mental Health Among Hispanics

Translate to Spanish or other 102 languages!

Mental health is a significant issue across the country. In 2021, over 57 million adults in the United States – about 1 in 5 – experienced mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Image for illustration purposes
Mental health is a significant issue across the country. In 2021, over 57 million adults in the United States – about 1 in 5 – experienced mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Image for illustration purposes

Mega Doctor News

- Advertisement -

By Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso

Dr. Nancy P. Ramirez, faculty instructor and clinical psychologist at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso’s Department of Psychiatry. Photo Credit: TTUHSC El Paso

Mental health is a significant issue across the country. In 2021, over 57 million adults in the United States – about 1 in 5 – experienced mental illness, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

As of February 2023, 36.8% of adults in Texas reported symptoms of anxiety and/or depressive disorder, compared to 32.3% of adults in the U.S., according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data.

- Advertisement -

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 35.1% of Hispanic/Latinx adults with mental illness receive treatment each year compared to the U.S. average of 46.2%.

Some cultures place a stigma on seeking mental health care, adding to the difficulties of treating a diverse patient population. According to a 2020 National Institutes of Mental Health and Health Disparities report, Hispanics are more likely to drop out before completing treatment and are less likely to obtain follow-up care.

  • What does that look like?
  • What are the most common serious mental illnesses among Hispanics?
  • What is being done to ensure people in Hispanic populations follow through with treatment plans?
  • What are the barriers to mental health care for Hispanics?
    • Language
    • Poverty – 0%of Hispanic/Latinx people in the U.S. live in poverty (compared to 8.2% of non-Hispanic whites). Individuals who live in poverty have a higher risk of mental illness and, conversely, individuals with mental illness have a higher risk of living in poverty.
    • Cultural competence (miss diagnosing due to lack of cultural understanding and language)
    • Stigma – Some people do not seek treatment for mental illness out of fear of being labeled as “locos” (crazy) or bringing shame and unwanted attention to their families. 
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -

More Articles

Prioritize Eye Health During Healthy Vision Month

Healthy vision is essential for children too.

It’s Never Too Early or Too Late to Reduce Your Skin Cancer Risk

“It’s never too early or too late in life to start protecting your skin from sun damage,” says Deborah S. Sarnoff, MD, president of The Skin Cancer Foundation.

New Imaging Software Improves Lung Diagnosis For 30% Of Patients Who Can’t Tolerate Contrast Dye

As a result, the software program helps doctors and researchers get consistent patient data, leading to better diagnoses and specifics on where to target potential therapies - all without contrast dye.

Celebrating Women’s Health Week, May 12th-18th

Staying physically healthy can improve your emotional well-being.
- Advertisement -
×