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Make the Most of Your Medication Plan

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Talk to your health care professional about your treatment plan, then stick to it! Medications along with healthy eating and physical activity, help lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. Image for illustration purposes
Talk to your health care professional about your treatment plan, then stick to it! Medications along with healthy eating and physical activity, help lower your risk of heart disease and stroke. Image for illustration purposes

Mega Doctor News

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American Heart Association

To help you better manage your diabetes and heart health, your health care team may prescribe medication. Talk to your health care professional about your treatment plan, then stick to it! Medications along with healthy eating and physical activity, help lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.

How Medication Helps

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Your health care team may choose medications to:

Manage blood glucose (blood sugar).

Manage blood pressure.

Manage cholesterol.

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Lower your risk for heart and kidney complications.

Stop blood clots.

Your medication may come in the form of a pill, an injection or you might use an insulin pump.

Sticking to your treatment plan can help stop or delay diabetes and heart attack or stroke.

A Prescription for Success

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by your medications. Building a routine will help keep them in order. Here are a few tips to help you manage your medications:

Type 2 Diabetes and Understanding Your Medications

Keep a list of everything you’re currently taking (including counter medications). Review your list with your health care professional at each appointment to discuss any needed changes to your treatment plan.

Fill your prescriptions as soon as you get them, and if possible, set them up for automatic refills.

Talk to your health care professional about the best timing for each of your prescriptions, whether to take them with or without food and what to do if you miss a dose.

When possible, add taking your medication as part of your daily routine like having breakfast, brushing your teeth or going to bed.

Divvy up your pill-based medications into a daily medication dispenser.

Set calendar reminders to take your medications or refill them.

Ask someone you care about to be your accountability buddy. A simple check-in now and then can go a long way!

The Right Plan, The Best Support

When it comes to your health, remember you’re in the driver’s seat. You’re able to live a healthy life and you can make changes today that will have a positive impact in the future. By taking your medications, as prescribed, you are lowering your risk for heart attack and stroke.

Here are some ideas to get started:

At your next appointment, ask your health care professional about how to lower your risk for heart disease and stroke.

Ask for a referral to a diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) services program (this is often covered by insurance).

Follow a healthy, balanced eating plan.

Move more and stay active. The goal is 150 active minutes per week and limit your time sitting (try to get up every 30 minutes).

Ask your health care professional if your diabetes is affecting your kidney function.

Stay positive! Scientists are making exciting new discoveries every day that will lead to a brighter future.

One of the most important things to keep in mind is that each person’s health journey is different. You may have some days where it feels like it’s harder than others. But your efforts will make a difference and it’s important to take steps to reach your goals!

Do your best to follow your treatment plan. Taking your medications as prescribed can have a big impact on your blood glucose levels, risks for heart disease and overall health. Remember, you’re not alone.

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF YOUR MEDICINE CHART HERE

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