News Briefs: September 2018

7

Mega Doctor News

As originally published in Mega Doctor News newsprint edition September 2018

Hospital Implements Strategies to Eliminate or Reduce Needle Pain in Kids

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Image for Illustration Only

A major US children’s hospital introduced a first-of-its-kind project to eliminate or reduce pain from elective needle procedures in all infants and children, reports a study in PAIN Reports®, part of a special issue on research innovations in pediatric pain. The official open-access journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain, PAIN Reports is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. “This is the first report of a successful system-wide protocol implementation to reduce or eliminate needle pain, including pain from vaccinations, in a children’s hospital worldwide,” write Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf, MD, FAAP, Donna Eull, RN, and their colleagues of Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Source: Newswise

New Test Kit Invented by NUS Researchers Enables Quick, Accurate, And Inexpensive Screening of Diseases

Pictured is enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids). Photo by NUS
Pictured is enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids). Photo by NUS

A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a portable, easy-to-use device for quick and accurate screening of diseases. This versatile technology platform called enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids) can be designed to detect a wide range of diseases – from emerging infectious diseases (e.g. Zika and Ebola) and high-prevalence infections (e.g. hepatitis, dengue, and malaria) to various types of cancers and genetic diseases. Source: Newswise

More Than Half of Parents of Sleep-Deprived Teens Blame Electronics

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It’s no secret that many teenagers stay up late to scroll through social media or catch up with friends on phones. And 56 percent of parents of teens who have sleep troubles believe this use of electronics is hurting their child’s shut-eye. Forty-three percent of parents report that their teen struggles to fall asleep or wakes up and can’t get back to sleep, according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan. Source: Newswise

It’s Not Too Early to Get Your Flu Shot

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It’s never too early to start preparing for flu season, and that’s exactly what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging Americans to do. Last year, seasonal influenza hit epidemic levels for 16 straight weeks and more than 700,000 people were hospitalized. What can you do to avoid the flu epidemic? Get vaccinated — and do it early. People should receive a flu shot by the end of October, the CDC advises. Source: Healthline

New Era in Virtual Reality Therapy for Common Phobias

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Virtual reality therapy can help people like Tracey by exposing them gradually to their greatest terrors. The technology is just now reaching the mainstream after 20 years of research. Equipment is lighter and more affordable, with tech advances spilling over from the gaming industry to help people fight disabling fears of flying, heights, spiders or dogs. Source: AP News

Academy Encourages Healthful Eating in Child Care Programs

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Early care and education programs should meet children’s nutrition needs and promote their optimal growth in safe and healthy environments, according to an updated position paper published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Children in child care are more likely to eat familiar foods consistent with foods provided at home,” said registered dietitian nutritionist Sara E. Benjamin-Neelon, who wrote the Academy’s position paper. Source: Newswise

What to Know About Sickle Cell Anemia

L-R: Normal Red Blood Cell, and Sickle Cell. (Image for Illustration only)
L-R: Normal Red Blood Cell, and Sickle Cell. (Image for Illustration only)

Healthy red blood cells are round, but for those with sickle cell disease, the red blood cells become sticky and hard because of an abnormal amount of protein in the blood. The red blood cells form the shape of a sickle or crescent. This change in shape can cause the blood cells to stick together and block off small blood vessels, which can lead to pain, organ damage, infection, acute chest syndrome, and stroke. Sickle cells also die early, causing a constant shortage of red blood cells. Source: Newswise