News Briefs March 2019

581

Mega Doctor NEWS

E-Cigarettes Can Also Harm Your Heart, Researchers Say

(Image for illustration purposes only.)
(Image for illustration purposes only.)

Researchers at the University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita say that when you’re vaping, it’s not just your lungs you have to worry about. It’s also your heart — and your mental health. Dr. Mohinder Vindhyal, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the Kansas institution, led the team of scientists. “When you smoke e-cigarettes, you are much more likely to have an MI [myocardial infarction or heart attack], coronary artery disease, stroke, and are more prone to suffer from depression,” Dr.Vindhyal said. Source: HealthLine

Playing Tetris can relieve PTSD flashbacks, study finds

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

People who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often undergo flashbacks, which are involuntary recurring visual memories of the frightful and upsetting experience. Researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden uncovered that Tetris, a puzzle computer game, can alleviate these symptoms, bypassing the conventional therapeutic approaches that are often scarce and hard to come by. Source: Medical News Bulletin

Blood Diseases Cured with Bone Marrow Transplant

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

Doubling the low amount of total body radiation delivered to patients undergoing bone marrow transplants with donor cells that are only “half-matched” increased the rate of engraftment from only about 50 percent to nearly 100 percent, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers. The findings, published online Mar. 13 in The Lancet Hematology, could offer a significantly higher chance of a cure for patients with severe and deadly inherited blood disorders including sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia. Source: Newswise

Forgetting Uses More Brain Power Than Remembering

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

Choosing to forget something might take more mental effort than trying to remember it, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin discovered through neuroimaging. These findings, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggest that in order to forget an unwanted experience, more attention should be focused on it. This surprising result extends prior research on intentional forgetting, which focused on reducing attention to the unwanted information through redirecting attention away from unwanted experiences or suppressing the memory’s retrieval. Source: Newswise 

Avocado Seeds May Have Anti-Inflammatory Properties

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

Researchers from the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) say that the overlooked avocado seeds yield an extract that may have important anti-inflammatory properties. Although the current results are promising, the researchers admit that they are only the first step in confirming the anti-inflammatory potential of avocado seeds. Source: Medical News Today

Protect Your Eyes from Too Much Screen Time

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

A recent study found that the average office worker spends 1,700 hours per year in front of a computer screen. And that doesn’t include our addiction to phones and other digital devices. All this screen time has led to an increase in complaints of eye strain, dry eye, headaches and insomnia. During Workplace Eye Wellness Month in March, the American Academy of Ophthalmology is offering tips to desk workers everywhere whose eyes may need relief from too much screen time. Source: Newswise

Marine Bacteria Offer New Weapon Against Melanoma

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

Skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer. Melanoma accounts for just 1 percent of skin cancer cases. However, melanoma causes the majority of skin cancer deaths, primarily because once it metastasizes, there are limited treatment options. A recent paper outlines how marine bacteria have inspired an entirely new way of fighting melanoma. The authors hope that their findings might eventually lead to a more effective treatment. Source: Medical News Today

A Nap a Day Keeps High Blood Pressure at Bay

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(Image for illustration purposes only.)

It seems that napping may do more than just reboot our energy level and improve our mood. New research has found that people who took advantage of a midday snooze were more likely to have a noticeable drop in blood pressure compared with those who didn’t nap. New research being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 68th Annual Scientific Session found that people who took advantage of a midday snooze were more likely to have a noticeable drop in blood pressure compared with those who didn’t nap. Source: ScienceDaily