News Briefs of June 2019

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Mega Doctor News

Hernias Can Happen to Anyone, Especially After Abdominal Surgery

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Most hernias occur in the abdomen, between the chest and the hips, and they can develop in men, women and children, often from a combination of muscle weakness and straining, like lifting something heavy. Some people are born with weak abdominal muscles and therefore may be more likely to develop a hernia. The most common treatment for a hernia is surgery to repair the opening in the muscle wall. Untreated hernias tend to keep growing, often causing pain and health problems. Source: Newswise

Low-Carb Diet May Reduce Diabetes Risk Independent of Weight Loss

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A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don’t lose any weight, a new study suggests. Researchers at The Ohio State University wanted to know what happens to obese people with metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes, when they eat a diet low in carbohydrates but don’t shed any pounds. They found that more than half of study participants no longer met the criteria for metabolic syndrome immediately following a four-week low-carb diet. Source: Newswise

Strategies to Curb Poor Food Choices

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What’s the best way to prevent children from overloading on bad food choices? Flinders University researchers have found that promoting substitution is the answer to turn around children’s excessive consumption of nutrient-poor foods and beverages – resulting in nutritional benefits that are even better than reducing intake of these discretionary food and drink choices. They found that substitution (replacing discretionary choices for healthy foods) and moderation (reduction of discretionary choices) achieved the greatest differences in energy, added sugars, and sodium intake, although substitution had a smaller impact on protein, fiber,and micronutrients readings compared with the moderation strategy. Source: Newswise 

Nutrition: Even Identical Twins Respond Differently to Food

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Despite repeated public awareness campaigns and official dietary recommendations, the obesity epidemic is a persistent problem in the United States, and obesity-related conditions such as metabolic syndrome are a growing concern. The lack of personalized dietary advice may partly be the reason for this. For instance, one study pointed out that giving specific weight loss tips and having an empathetic approach toward those trying to lose weight can be much more beneficial than simply telling someone to improve their diet. Source: Medical News Today 

Strength Training May Help People with Diabetes

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Insulin is a hormone that the pancreas produces to regulate blood sugar levels. When the body does not produce enough insulin or cannot use it, diabetes occurs. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimate that diabetes caused 1.6 million deaths in 2016 and that high blood sugar levels played a role in 2.2 million deaths in 2012. In many cases, people can avoid diabetes by following a healthful diet and exercising. To develop new drugs that reproduce some of the benefits of physical activity, a team of scientists in Brazil analyzed the effects of strength training on the livers of mice. Source: Medical News Today

How Burnout at Work May Be Causing You to Gain Weight

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Exhaustion and work fatigue might be bad for more than just your morale. They might be terrible for your waistline, too. A new study from researchers at the University of Georgia in Athens found that adults who feel overworked or burned out often adopt an array of unhealthy behaviors that can lead to weight gain. The researchers recruited almost 1,000 men and women who were working full-time jobs. They asked them to answer questions about their workloads as well as their feelings of exhaustion or burnout. They also asked the study participants to report their eating and exercise habits. Source: Healthline

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Fast Walkers May Live 15–20 Years Longer Than the Rest of Us

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Taking a brisk walk could increase your odds of living longer, and it doesn’t matter how much you weigh when you slip on your walking shoes, a new study suggests. People who have a quicker walking pace lived longer than those who walked more slowly, according to researchers who monitored the walking habits and deaths of nearly 475,000 people, most of whom were in their 50s at the start of the study. “Brisk walking” was defined by researchers as walking at least 3 miles per hour, or 100 steps a minute. Participants with brisk walking paces had longer life expectancies across all categories of BMI, according to the study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Source: Healthline

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