News Briefs: January 2019

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Mega Doctor News

New tool calculates breast cancer risk with greater precision

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UK scientists have developed an online calculator that could enable doctors to more accurately predict a patient’s chance of developing breast cancer. Among other things, details of family history, genetics, weight, alcohol consumption, age at menopause and use of hormone replacement therapy will all be considered by doctors when assessing a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer – the most common form of cancer in the UK. Source: CNN

A good night’s sleep could lower cardiovascular risk

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Many studies have emphasized the importance of sleep in maintaining our health and well-being in general. Increasingly, however, researchers are finding out how sleep quality affects specific aspects of a person’s health. Source: Medical News Today

Following heart health guidelines also reduces diabetes risk

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Lifestyle and health factors that are good for your heart can also prevent diabetes, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine that published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Source: ScienceDaily

Stress may raise the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

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Many factors may increase Alzheimer’s risk, including age, family history, and genetic makeup. New research indicates that psychological factors could also affect risk. Psychological distress, in particular, may increase the likelihood of developing dementia, suggests the new study. Source: Medical News Today

Scientists design ‘smart’ wound healing technique

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New research, published in the journal Advanced Materials, paves the way for “a new generation of materials that actively work with tissues to drive [wound] healing.” The molecules are called traction force-activated payloads (TrAPs). They are growth factors that help materials such as collagen interact with the body’s tissues more naturally. Source: Medical News Today

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The world’s most popular coffee species are going extinct. 

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Savor that cup of coffee while you can. New research shows 60% of coffee species found in the wild could soon go extinct. Researchers at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in the UK warn that climate change, deforestation, droughts and plant diseases are putting the future of coffee at risk. Source: CNN Health

High-fiber diet linked to lower risk of death and chronic diseases

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People who eat diets that are high in fiber have lower risk of death and chronic diseases such as stroke or cancer compared with people with low fiber intake, a new analysis found. Dietary fiber includes plant-based carbohydrates such as whole-grain cereal, seeds and some legumes. Source: CNN Health

Measles outbreak grows in area with low vaccination rate, most patients unimmunized

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A measles outbreak in southwestern Washington state has grown to 16 confirmed cases, and most of the children affected are unimmunized against the disease, officials said. In 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 17 outbreaks in the U.S. and a total of 349 cases. People choosing not to vaccinate has emerged into a global health threat in 2019, the World Health Organization recently reported. Source: USA Today

Exercise ‘snacks’ make fitness easier: Researchers find short bouts of stairclimbing throughout the day can boost health

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It just got harder to avoid exercise. A few minutes of stair climbing, at short intervals throughout the day, can improve cardiovascular health, according to new research from kinesiologists at McMaster University and UBC Okanagan. The findings, published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, suggest that virtually anyone can improve their fitness, anywhere, any time. Source: Newswise